Thomas Economon

Thomas D. Economon


Department of Aeronautics & Astronautics
Durand Building, Room 464
Stanford, CA 94305
More information and a complete CV can be found here.

Background

Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford University, 2014-Present
PhD, Aeronautics & Astronautics, Stanford University, 2014
MS, Aeronautics & Astronautics, Stanford University, 2010
BS, Aerospace Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 2008

Research Interests

  • Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)
  • Optimal Shape Design (OSD) via Adjoint-based Methods
  • Unsteady Flows on Dynamic Meshes
  • High Performance Computing
  • Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis, & Optimization (MDAO)
  • Aircraft Conceptual Design Techniques for Advanced Configurations
  • Environmentally Responsible Aviation
  • Passive & Active Flow Control
  • Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA)

Recent Work

My research focuses on the development of new computational design methodologies for aerospace systems, including high-fidelity, adjoint-based techniques for optimal shape design, as well as tools for design at the conceptual level. These new methodologies will enable the design of next generation aerospace vehicles with greatly reduced fuel burn, emissions, and noise. Understanding and leveraging advanced computational hardware (novel architectures and cluster computing) are critical components of this simulation-based research.

Ongoing work includes: developing the SU2 software suite, extending the aerodynamic analysis and design methodologies in the SU2 suite to massively parallel platforms as part of an Intel Parallel Computing Center, and supporting the computational science/computer science efforts to create physics applications for exascale platforms as part of the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program II (PSAAP II) at Stanford.

Dissertation

Economon, T. D., Optimal Shape Design Using an Unsteady Continuous Adjoint Approach, PhD thesis, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, 2014.

Publications

A complete list of publications can be found here.